Posts Tagged ‘daily feed’

The Daily Feed Issue #20: Attracting targeted visitors

September 3, 2010  |  The Daily Feed  |  Comments Off

Welcome to Issue #20 of The Daily Feed. If this email was forwarded to you by a friend, you can subscribe on this page. You can read previous editions of The Daily Feed on our blog but note that posts to our blog are delayed 24 hours or more.

Danette, one of my readers, sent me a question asking: “I make a living from my online business. How can I attract the right kind of people to my blog who are interested in buying from my online stores. It is a fairly exact niche of people and I don’t want to hire anyone.”
There are three ways to get people to visit your site:
  • Via search engines
  • When they click a link on another website that brings them to your site.
  • When they see an ad for your site offline or hear about it from a friend and type in the URL.
Remembering URL’s in the offline world is very hard for most people and that kind of brand marketing doesn’t work very well for small businesses so I would strongly recommend that you focus your efforts on the online world. 
Lets pretend you sell booties online for Huskies so that their feet don’t get cold in the snow. You only ship to the USA and Canada. That’s a fairly niche market. Start by defining who it is you’re trying to attract:
  • People who own Huskies 
  • People who live in the USA and Canada.
  • People who live in areas that get snow each winter.
  • People who spoil their dogs enough to buy something as specific as booties.
  • People who buy online.
These bullets are criteria that define your target market. If any one of them is missing, it disqualifies the person as a buyer. If it doesn’t snow where they live, they won’t buy. If they’re outside the USA and Canada, they won’t buy. If they don’t buy online, they’re not your target market. 

Print out the bullets that define your target market and as you go about your marketing efforts, test what you’re doing against each one of them. Before approaching a blog to do a guest post or a website to get a link, test that site’s audience against your bullets to see if the site’s visitors are your target market. 

Now that you’ve defined your target market, here are a few ideas to help you get your website link in front of them:
  1. Get links from websites where your target market hangs out. You’ll benefit directly from a few clicks and indirectly via SEO. Google’s blog search is a great way to find blogs that your target market reads. 
  2. Do guest posts on blogs that your target market reads and be sure to include several links to your site.
  3. Write a feature article for an online magazine that your target market reads. Don’t bother with offline magazines because few people will remember your website name.
  4. Find people on Twitter who have a lot of followers who are your target market and get them to tweet about your site. Use Twitter’s own search engine to help.
  5. Network your way to people on Facebook who have friends who are your target market and get them to post a link on Facebook. Trade shows and other industry events are great places to make friends that might be able to help you later. 

If you have a niche website, your marketing efforts will be similar to most website’s with the difference that your efforts need to be laser focused. Defining your target market gives you a way to constantly evaluate if your efforts are focused correctly.

Regards,

Mark Maunder
Feedjit Founder & CEO.

The Daily Feed Issue #19: How long does SEO take? (part 2)

September 2, 2010  |  The Daily Feed  |  Comments Off

Welcome to Issue #19 of The Daily Feed. If this email was forwarded to you by a friend, you can subscribe on this page. You can read previous editions of The Daily Feed on our blog but note that posts to our blog are delayed 24 hours or more. Send suggestions for future editions to my personal address at mark@feedjit.com.


As always this edition is brought to you by the team at Feedjit.comKnow when your friends and clients visit you with Feedjit!

Today I’m concluding my series on how long SEO takes to kick in with a few examples. 

The most effective thing you can do to get your site listed in Google fast and to get a good ranking is to get very high quality back-links. In my experience the best strategy to get back-links is to get main-stream press coverage and by publishing link-bait. See issue #11 for more on link bait

If you have a site that’s been around for a while, you have an advantage. If an established site suddenly gets a few high quality back-links it will generally ramp up it’s search traffic faster than a new site.

Lets look at a hypothetical example. This is based on anecdotal evidence that I’ve seen. There is no scientific basis behind this and your mileage my vary wildly from these numbers. It’s simply what I’d expect to see.

Example: You have a new domain name and a new website. 1000 pages of new, unique and useful content that generally is searched for by many people in a not-too-competitive category. As you launch you get covered in The New York Times. A few hundred bloggers and B-level news outlets pick up your story and either republish it verbatim or add their own 2 cents – all with back-links to you. Here’s what I’d expect to see:

Within a few days you have a few hundred visitors from search engines arriving via keywords that are on-target within your category. In other words, if you have a jewelry store your visitors will arrive by Googleing things related to jewelry. Within a few weeks you’re getting 1,000 to 3,000 unique visitors per day from Google and the other SE’s. 

Now lets look at a few variables:

If your site’s domain is already established and has already been getting some search traffic when you get your big NYTimes coverage, then I’d expect to see your traffic ramp up faster and peak at a higher number.

If your established links are “deep links”, meaning that they link not just to your home page but to pages deep in your site then you’ll also see a better result. If the links you get after your launch from bloggers and websites are also deep links, then you should also expect to see an ongoing boost in ranking and indexing. 

If your site continues to get medium to high quality links over time, then you’ll see a much better result over the first few months and ongoing. 

If you have a history of adding a page or three of new content per day before your big launch and you continue to add new content each day after your big launch, then you’ll also get better results. Google loves new content.

It’s rare to get good coverage in a main stream news publication. But this should give you a good idea of the kinds of things that accelerate getting indexed and that boost your ranking. Links from a second or third tier publication are also great and have a similar, if less pronounced effect on getting indexed and your ranking. 

The best advice I can give you on getting indexed fast is to pretend you’re a search engine. If you see a site that’s new, has lots of unique content and is newly popular with high ranking websites, you’re going to want to tell your searchers about it fast!

Regards,

Mark Maunder.
Feedjit Founder & CEO.

The Daily Feed Issue #18: How long does SEO take? (and your feedback)

September 1, 2010  |  The Daily Feed  |  Comments Off
Welcome to Issue #18 of The Daily Feed. If this email was forwarded to you by a friend, you can subscribe on this page. You can read previous editions of The Daily Feed on our blog but note that posts to our blog are delayed 24 hours or more.

I’ve been getting great suggestions all day for upcoming editions of The Daily Feed. Special thanks to Kevin, Diana, Saira, Danette, Jenny and Donna for your feedback and ideas. Please keep sending your suggestions to mark@feedjit.com

These are questions we’ve chosen from today’s feedback that I’ll be answering in upcoming editions:

K.S. After you’ve done the SEO magic you need to do, how long does it take for your site to start climbing in rankings?
K.S. Why has Google ranked some plain-jane commercial and non-information websites higher than others?
K.S. If your blog is a niche blog that focuses on something very specific, how can you turn it into a great resource where experts want to go and also attract thousands of hits?
K.S. What if you started your blog way back with a not-so-strategic name – like I did – but now when someone plugs in a search term I come up first or so on Google – so I am afraid to change the blogs name now. What should I do?
K.S. Do you seriously think I’ll ever get up to hundred hits or so a day with a topic like …?
S.F. How important is it to be specific on your blog? Being specific may define and facilitate getting hits from your target market, but sometimes it restricts you from sharing on your blog what you want to.
D.D. I make a living from my online business. How can I attract the right kind of people to my blog who are interested in buying from my online stores. It is a fairly exact niche of people and I don’t want to hire anyone.
D.T. asked me to include a few war stories on the struggles I’ve encountered doing business online, things that inspired me and helped me overcome them. 

Today’s edition covers a question from Kevin S on how long SEO takes to give you a return on your time investment.

Between 2004 and 2005 it took us 10 months to grow a site from zero to 3,000 unique visitors per day from the search engines. In month 10 the traffic went from almost zero to 3000 visitors overnight and then up to 10,000 visits per day 3 months later.

Back in 2004 and 2005 Google would only update their search index every 1 to 3 months. We (and other SEO’s) would call this the “Google Dance”. For a few days search results would bounce around wildly as Google pushed out their new index to their data centers all over the world, and then things would stabilize for another few months. 

Today Google updates almost in real-time. They will do a major index update once every month or two, but they are constantly adding new sites and new pages. Your newest blog entry will usually appear in the search results a few hours after you post it. A popular website can have reasonable SEO traffic a few days after launch if they have the right content and the right kind of launch.

Tomorrow I’ll chat about strategies that will get you indexed fast and what “the right kind of launch” means.

Just an FYI: I’m still working on the eBook. It will be ready asap and will be announced here first. The Daily Feed subscriber discount still applies!

Regards,

Mark Maunder.
Feedjit Founder & CEO.

The Daily Feed Issue #17: Curing writer’s block

August 31, 2010  |  The Daily Feed  |  Comments Off

Welcome to Issue #17 of The Daily Feed. If this email was forwarded to you by a friend, you can subscribe on this page. You can read previous editions of The Daily Feed on our blog.

Today I have writer’s block so what better subject to write about than finding the cure. In previous editions of The Daily Feed I’ve written about the importance of creating new, unique and useful content to get traffic from search engines. It’s tough to come up with an on-topic page of great content every day for your blog or website, so here are a few tips to overcome writer’s block. 
CopyBlogger says the best way to overcome writer’s block is to start digging through famous quotes and draw inspiration from them. Many quotes can be the seed for an entire blog entry. Wikiquote is a great resource for finding quotes. In fact the quote on the home page today would make a fine blog entry:  ”The price of hating other human beings is loving oneself less.” ~ Eldridge Cleaver ~
Hemingway, one of my favorite authors, wrote a lot about his own life experiences. If you’re run out of things to write about, one approach is to go and have some fun or go out and have an adventure. Clamber down into a canyon you’ve never been in to go fishing. Or walk up to 3 random strangers in the mall and ask them a question. That should quickly fill your literary fuel tank. 

There are the usual cliche’s of “Carry a notebook with you” or “go and get some excercise – the blood flow to your brain will increase creativity”. Well what if you weren’t carrying the darn notebook with you and now you’re working to a deadline? Or it’s 2am and the neighbors might call the cops if they see you out running right now. That’s the situation I find myself in on this Tuesday morning at 2:22am pacific standard time.

The very best advice I’ve ever read on overcoming writer’s block is the following from Gary Bencivenga, a former Madison Avenue ad exec:

“I discovered that “writer’s block” is just a symptom of a rather easily cured malady—”LRS,” or Lazy Research Syndrome. It took me a while to realize that the best copywriters are the most tenacious researchers. Like miners, they dig, drill, dynamite, and chip until they have carloads of valuable ore. John Caples advised me once to gather seven times more interesting information than I could possibly use.”

That’s all for today’s edition. Click here to send an email to my personal email address and tell me what you would like to read about in upcoming editions of The Daily Feed.

Regards,

Mark Maunder
Feedjit Founder & CEO

The Daily Feed Issue #16: Evaluating link exchange proposals

August 30, 2010  |  The Daily Feed  |  Comments Off

Welcome to Issue #16 of The Daily Feed. If this email was forwarded to you by a friend, you can subscribe on this page. You can read previous editions of The Daily Feed on our blog.

In previous editions of The Daily Feed I’ve chatted about the importance of link development. If you run a blog or website that gets a reasonable amount of traffic you’ve probably been approached a lot by people wanting to exchange links with you. Should you do it? That’s the subject of today’s Daily Feed.

I’ll cut right to the chase: Google doesn’t like link exchange programs. They have a page talking about link schemes and it says you’ll be penalized if you engage in “excessive” link exchanges. They don’t define what excessive is. But here’s some interesting gossip. When this page first came out in 2007 the paragraph that deals with link exchanges read as follows:

Examples of link schemes can include:
link exchange and reciprocal links schemes (“link to me and I’ll link to you.”) 
After receiving some backlash from the webmaster community they changed it to read:
Examples of link schemes can include:
Excessive reciprocal links or excessive link exchanging (“link to me and I’ll link to you.”)

Notice the change? Clearly they don’t like link exchanges and they’ll tolerate some exchanging of links between websites but they aren’t clear on how much that is. 
My advice to you is the following:
  1. Only exchange links with 2 or 3 websites that are VERY relevant. If you have a website about coffee, then only exchange links with other websites that talk about coffee, and the same brand of coffee that you talk about. 
  2. Don’t exchange links with a site that has exchanged links with many other sites. They may be penalized by Google and best case they won’t give you any boost in ranking and worst case they’ll cause you to be penalized too.
  3. Install Google’s toolbar and check what the site’s pagerank is. If it’s less than 3 then I wouldn’t bother. 
  4. Visit the site and click “view source” in your browser’s view menu. Check if the links to other sites have a “nofollow” attribute and don’t link to the site if they do. You can read about nofollow here
In general I don’t exchange links with anyone, but when you’re starting out it’s tough to get those first few links that help Google find your site. So exchange a few links with relevant sites but evaluate each of them carefully and limit the amount of exchanging you do. 
Regards,
Mark Maunder
Feedjit Founder & CEO